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Discussion Starter #1
I'm installating my system tomorrow!!


I just wanted to make sure of a few things before I do though, and I would appreciate some of the more experienced posters to confirm (or correct) me!


For automatic, put the car in neutral, parking brake on.

Disconnect the NEGATIVE/GROUND cable from the battery

Run the power lead from the positive battery terminal through a grommet that I have to cut which is up high on the passenger-side firewall (as discussed here). I also need a fuse within 2 feet of the battery

To remove the panels to run the cable, I'll refer to the PDF for the OEM sub install.

I'm putting the amp under the seat, so I'll remove the seat but leave the two plugs (assumingly side air bag and the "is there someone sitting here so i can flash the seatbelt light" sensor) plugged in. I'm not so sure I want to unplug the airbag wire, but if it makes no difference because the battery is disconnected, someone please let me know so I can take to seat out of the car.

I'm running the patch cable through the center console to keep it away from the power lead. I'm hoping that this how-to on installing the OEM sub and light kit, will show me how to remove enough panels to get to the seat. Is there anything I should know about doing this?

Amp turn-on wire will run the same route. I can just use any 16-guage wire, right??

Ground wire will go onto one of the seat bolts.

I'll run the speaker wire to the trunk, via the side as explained in the OEM sub install PDF.

Some other notes... I'm "mounting" the amp with "Industrial-Strength" velcro from Wal-Mart. Any objections to that? I've made my own patch cable with a twisted Ethernet cable (thanks Alpman!!) and I've tested it and it works! To use my factory head unit, I bought one of the adapters from euro_werks on eBay (like this).


I know this is a lot to ask of people to answer, but I know you guys are extremely helpful! As always, thanks a lot!

I've done this before on two of my previous cars, but I want this to be something that I'm proud of because I did it myself, and it looks clean and professional. That's why I'm asking for guidance.

Thanks!
 

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Sounds like you've got things under control, I just installed an amp in my tC last weekend. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Awesome, thanks!

I'll leave the seat plugged in and just try and move it out of the way, because I don't want to risk screwing up the airbag.

I'm gonna lay the cables down here in a few minutes, wish me luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I ran the wires today. I'm going to wait until I get paid Friday to buy the amp and sub.

I had two big problems. One, I had a very difficult time getting the power wire through that hole high on the passenger side firewall. I'm 6'4" and have big hands, so I had to improvise. From the engine side, removing the engine cover helped a lot. I was able to easily get my whole hand to the firewall, and still have enough wiggle-room to do what I needed to do. Inside the car looked horrible. My big fat hands cant squeeze through the Engine computer, so I took it off. I unplugged the top two harnesses, unscrewed the bottom screw with a big Philips-head and a 10mm wrench for the top one. I couldn't fit a ratchet in to get the top screw, which sucked because it was in really tight. First attempted my hand slipped off the wrench and I lost a fairly decent-sized chunk of flesh off the top of my index finger. So, if you're going to remove that screw, be careful! Once that was off though, it was cake. Remember which harness plugs into which slot on the Engine computer (or whatever the crap that stupid thing is... you know, lots of wires plugging into the thing to the right of the cabin air filter... I don't know enough about cars!) Edit: Click here for a picture and it's the thing on the right, that's what I removed.

My second headache was with the back passenger-side panel in the trunk. I was following the OEM sub install guide and removed it, just so I could see how to route my speakerwire. That thing was SO hard to put back in. I ended up breaking a couple clips!! It looks terrible on the inside, but fine on the outside. The top of the panel is hard plastic, and has a slot that a clip on the backseat-panel slides into. I couldn't make that clip go in for the life of me without bending it forward with my fingers and forcing it in. Of course, while doing that, I wasn't able to plug in one of those white clips. Anyway, it was a big mess. Luckily, you can't see any of the damage I did, and I really really hope I dont have to take that panel off again.

I didn't get enough speakwire, so I'm going to have to take most of the trunk apart again to add an extension. And since I didn't actually plug in an amplifier, I really don't even know if everything's plugged in correctly. And, I didn't have any 18 gauge wire for the amp lead, so I used some 20, is that going to be a big deal? I mean, it only gets a turn-on signal, or a turn-off signal... how much current could it need!?

Here's a big question: I have ALL of the cables (power, ground, patch, amp lead, and speaker) going into the hole in the carpet that was already under the seat for the [wires that go to the seat]. I know that if patch and power cables ever meet, they need to be angled 90 degrees, which would mean that having everything going in and out of this single hole isn't a good thing. After the amp is on the floor, should I cut new holes in the carpet so the wires come out right next to the amp's connectors, or is it okay having it like it is? If I'm not making myself clear, I can take a digital picture and upload it.

And a couple technical questions: I've decided that I'm getting the Alpine MRP-M350 as my amp and the Alpine SWS-1042D as my sub. The sub is a dual 4-ohm, so the amp will push 350w RMS at 2 ohms, if I wire it in a parallel (right)?
The guy at Tweeter matched me up with the same amp and the JL Audio CS110RG-W0, which would have the amp push 200w RMS at 4 ohms to a SVC sub that is rated at 125w RMS. Now, Crutchfield once told me "We usually recommend that you drive your subwoofers with at least 70% (70-100%) of their maximum RMS rating to get them to perform at their optimum. The closer to 100% you power them, the harder they hit and the better they sound." Ok, if that's true, why would the guy at Tweeter match me up so poorly? AND, wouldn't I try and go for a DVC so I could get more power (with a 2-ohm load)?

This is clearly my longest post ever, forgive me! I want this to be perfect!
I'm sorry for being so demanding with my questions, but I'm not an expert (maybe intermediate
) THANKS!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Originally posted by alanthing@Oct 5 2004, 07:46 PM
I ran the wires today. I'm going to wait until I get paid Friday to buy the amp and sub.

I had two big problems. One, I had a very difficult time getting the power wire through that hole high on the passenger side firewall. I'm 6'4" and have big hands, so I had to improvise. From the engine side, removing the engine cover helped a lot. I was able to easily get my whole hand to the firewall, and still have enough wiggle-room to do what I needed to do. Inside the car looked horrible. My big fat hands cant squeeze through the Engine computer, so I took it off. I unplugged the top two harnesses, unscrewed the bottom screw with a big Philips-head and a 10mm wrench for the top one. I couldn't fit a ratchet in to get the top screw, which sucked because it was in really tight. First attempted my hand slipped off the wrench and I lost a fairly decent-sized chunk of flesh off the top of my index finger. So, if you're going to remove that screw, be careful! Once that was off though, it was cake. Remember which harness plugs into which slot on the Engine computer (or whatever the crap that stupid thing is... you know, lots of wires plugging into the thing to the right of the cabin air filter... I don't know enough about cars!) Edit: Click here for a picture and it's the thing on the right, that's what I removed.

My second headache was with the back passenger-side panel in the trunk. I was following the OEM sub install guide and removed it, just so I could see how to route my speakerwire. That thing was SO hard to put back in. I ended up breaking a couple clips!! It looks terrible on the inside, but fine on the outside. The top of the panel is hard plastic, and has a slot that a clip on the backseat-panel slides into. I couldn't make that clip go in for the life of me without bending it forward with my fingers and forcing it in. Of course, while doing that, I wasn't able to plug in one of those white clips. Anyway, it was a big mess. Luckily, you can't see any of the damage I did, and I really really hope I dont have to take that panel off again.

I didn't get enough speakwire, so I'm going to have to take most of the trunk apart again to add an extension. And since I didn't actually plug in an amplifier, I really don't even know if everything's plugged in correctly. And, I didn't have any 18 gauge wire for the amp lead, so I used some 20, is that going to be a big deal? I mean, it only gets a turn-on signal, or a turn-off signal... how much current could it need!?

Here's a big question: I have ALL of the cables (power, ground, patch, amp lead, and speaker) going into the hole in the carpet that was already under the seat for the [wires that go to the seat]. I know that if patch and power cables ever meet, they need to be angled 90 degrees, which would mean that having everything going in and out of this single hole isn't a good thing. After the amp is on the floor, should I cut new holes in the carpet so the wires come out right next to the amp's connectors, or is it okay having it like it is? If I'm not making myself clear, I can take a digital picture and upload it.

And a couple technical questions: I've decided that I'm getting the Alpine MRP-M350 as my amp and the Alpine SWS-1042D as my sub. The sub is a dual 4-ohm, so the amp will push 350w RMS at 2 ohms, if I wire it in a parallel (right)?
The guy at Tweeter matched me up with the same amp and the JL Audio CS110RG-W0, which would have the amp push 200w RMS at 4 ohms to a SVC sub that is rated at 125w RMS. Now, Crutchfield once told me "We usually recommend that you drive your subwoofers with at least 70% (70-100%) of their maximum RMS rating to get them to perform at their optimum. The closer to 100% you power them, the harder they hit and the better they sound." Ok, if that's true, why would the guy at Tweeter match me up so poorly? AND, wouldn't I try and go for a DVC so I could get more power (with a 2-ohm load)?

This is clearly my longest post ever, forgive me! I want this to be perfect!
I'm sorry for being so demanding with my questions, but I'm not an expert (maybe intermediate
) THANKS!!!!!!!!!!
The Alpine website was not working just before I type this so I could not get the factory specs. It is very possible that the 200 Watt rating was measured using the new CEA standard that most of the 12 Volt industry has adopted. If so, the output of said amp at 12.5V (in car voltage) would be roughly 140 Watts. If that's a "Max Power" (I am not sure if they use that) then all bets are off!
The Power Chart will show you how this amount of power would have affected a 10W0 (it's moot now).
I don't like addressing other product because I spend absolutely no time looking at what other manufacturer's do. Most feedback I hear from other manufacturers trainings goes something like this: "this is better than a W7". I really don't care / pay attention. The reality is the salesperson at Tweeter will know more about that amps true capabilities that I would. I see no problem with the original recommendation. The Crutchfield sales math is just that.
I would hook it up and enjoy without worries.

Good luck with it!
 

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QUOTE
Here's a big question: I have ALL of the cables (power, ground, patch, amp lead, and speaker) going into the hole in the carpet that was already under the seat for the [wires that go to the seat]. I know that if patch and power cables ever meet, they need to be angled 90 degrees, which would mean that having everything going in and out of this single hole isn't a good thing. After the amp is on the floor, should I cut new holes in the carpet so the wires come out right next to the amp's connectors, or is it okay having it like it is? If I'm not making myself clear, I can take a digital picture and upload it.[/b]
You should be fine leaving them in that hole. If you get any noise you might try separating them, but I doubt you will.
 

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Originally posted by alanthing@Oct 5 2004, 07:46 PM
I didn't get enough speakwire, so I'm going to have to take most of the trunk apart again to add an extension. And since I didn't actually plug in an amplifier, I really don't even know if everything's plugged in correctly. And, I didn't have any 18 gauge wire for the amp lead, so I used some 20, is that going to be a big deal? I mean, it only gets a turn-on signal, or a turn-off signal... how much current could it need!?
Its better to NOT have any patches in your wiring.... patches are where you pick up nasty engine noise.

Also I would get some 18ga. wire for your amp turn on lead just to be safe.

IMHO.... DVC subs are overrated.
 

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The MRP-M350 and the SWS-1241D is a perfect match. It should perform very well.

You need a 2 Ohm load for that amp to perform at it's best. It is a class-D (Digital PWM) monoblock and will almost double it's power at 2 Ohms. And because it is a class-D amp, it requires less current, and therefore less strain on your charging system, than a conventional amplifier. It will also produce much less heat than most amps.

It IS rated under the new CEA guidelines at 14.4V, but when is the last time your alternator charged your battery at 12V? If it did, you would likely have a dead battery in just a few weeks. Most alternators charge between 13.6 and 14.4V in the real world, not 12V. Why not take advantage of that extra voltage and turn it into more power??? If you use a regulated amplifier rated at say 12.5V and give it additional charging voltage, you will NOT get any additional power. That is exactly why the CEA came up with these new ratings, so all manufacturers are on a level playing field and the consumer has a "real world" spec to compare ALL brands.

BTW-I checked it and MY tC charges at 13.9-14.1V at idle and 14.0-14.3V at about 2500 RPM.

The woofer is rated at 300W RMS and the amp is conservatively rated at 350W RMS. It may seem like you might overpower the woofer, but if you read my article on level setting, you'll understand why it's not a problem. Good luck. Hope it all turns out for you.
 

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Originally posted by onefunkyfreshdj+Oct 6 2004, 06:04 PM-->QUOTE (onefunkyfreshdj @ Oct 6 2004, 06:04 PM)
<!--QuoteBegin-alanthing
@Oct 5 2004, 07:46 PM
I didn't get enough speakwire, so I'm going to have to take most of the trunk apart again to add an extension. And since I didn't actually plug in an amplifier, I really don't even know if everything's plugged in correctly. And, I didn't have any 18 gauge wire for the amp lead, so I used some 20, is that going to be a big deal? I mean, it only gets a turn-on signal, or a turn-off signal... how much current could it need!?
Its better to NOT have any patches in your wiring.... patches are where you pick up nasty engine noise.

Also I would get some 18ga. wire for your amp turn on lead just to be safe.

IMHO.... DVC subs are overrated. [/b]
DVC subs are over-rated? Maybe if you've got just one compared to a single SVC sub, but if you're trying to run odd combinations of several subs (3 subs, 5 subs, etc.) then DVC might be the way to go depending on your setup and what impedence your amp can handle. DVC subs aren't meant to be a competitor of SVC subs, they're used for a totally different purpose and serve their purpose well in certain situations, if you know what you're doing.
 
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