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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just became a member and i had a couple of questions...

ive had my 06 scion tc for about 3 weeks (first new car, first manual car)

and i had a couple questions about the clutch and shifter
sorry if they have already been asked and or answered

1. how long does it take to replace a clutch? like how many miles? ... although it is my first stick car, i never hold the clutch for more then 5 seconds at a time so i dont think ill be damaging it soon.. or am i?

2. how much does it cost to get a new clutch? i heard they were pricey?

3. sometimes when i want to go into reverse... it wont let me...
..... i found that if i put it back in neutral and i put it in like 2 other gears, i try putting it back in reverse and it works... is this the only way to do this? or is my reverse having problems?

4. sometimes im going about 3-5mph and i put it in second.. is this ok or should i put it back in first?

5. i am NOT grinding my gears, but when i change gears i dont feel it go in smooth... when i put it in perfectly straight up and down from neutral into the gear it slides in perfect... but if i push it to a side a little it doesnt go in as smooth.. why?

6. is it ok to drive your car without warming it up first?

7. i heard that manual cars dont ever need to be jump started because the battery doesnt start the car as it starts an auto?


thank you in advance for the help!
 

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I have only had my car for a little while and this is also my first car and first manual. So I will help you out to the best of my knowledge. Anyone can correct me because I'm probably wrong with a few of the answers

1.) Depends on how you drive it, if you powershift and ride on the clutch all the time it could have to be replaced after 50,000 miles or less. But if you drive it right it should last you a lot longer.

2.) Depends on the clutch your getting, the TRD performance clutch or something like that is around 500 dollars so I think an OEM would a little less.

3.) This is a safety feature that you can read about in your Manual that came with the car. Put it into nuetral then lift off clutch then push the clutch back in and it should go into reverse. I also learned that if you put it into 1st then into reverse that also works.

4.) As long as you don't hear your engine lug then you're fine. Just leave it in first untill 10 if possible.

5.) You will get better at shifting. I had that problem when I was starting out and now it is pretty smooth. Don't worry about second gear crunchy, its a problem that has been discussed and I believe its just part of how the car works.

6.) It is best to warm it up so the fluids can work proporly. 30 Seconds is good, just dont go over 3000 RPM's if possible.

7.) I have no clue.

I hope I helped you and anyone that has anything to add or fix about what I said is glad to fix mine. As I said I've only had my car for about 4 months now so I for sure don't know everything.

-Eric
 

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Don't worry about your clutch going out; you can hold it in for an hour and still have it last for over 50,000 miles. It wont do much damage, just some wear and tear on your pressure plates. Clutches + clutch jobs (installation) is a bitch; don't try to upgrade if you just learned how to drive a manual transmission. Sports and racing clutches are much more stiff and generally harder to drive.
You can start in second if you want, but its probably best to go atleast 10-15 mph before shifting to second. First gear is a bit touchy in the beginning; you will get used to it. Gear changing in the tC ,and a lot of other sport coupes, is pretty loud and not smoothe feeling. It's fine don't worry about it; your car is doing what it is supposed to do, just treat it nicely. I think the other eric covered everything else also..

Good luck and have fun with your brand new car!
p.s. where did you hear that Jumping a manual car was not necessary?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
im not exactly sure where i heard it from
but i heard the battery has nothing to do with starting the car if you have a manual.

...also, i dont think id be doing any motifications or upgrades to my car for a while... hack, i dont even know what an intake is. so newbie!

thanks.
 

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Starter works very similar in auto and stick cars. Battery powered and all. One difference - you can start a manual with a dead battery by riding it downhill in 1st and popping the clutch. Can't do that in auto.

I'm replacing the clutch on mine next week - not because it is worn, but because it might be worn after having 4 people learn to drive MT on my car, and having to tear up the car anyway to install lightweight flywheel. Regular performance clutch costs $300, kevlar one that I got cost me $420. OEM is about $170, maybe a tad more.
 

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Jump starting a car, that is starting a MT car with a dead battery is kind of interesting challenge. I learned MT over 30 years ago, and I still stall the tC when I am not having a good day.
I say that so you don't get too hyper about your car. If you wanted a smooth running car, you should have gotten an AT. Be that as it may, MTs are much more fun.

Proper way to start a dead batteried MT goes like this. Put the car in neutral. Push car so that it can go down hill. Barring that, have friends that can push it and make it go fast enough while in neutral. Once you are going a few MPH (read that as in over a couple or less than 5 unless you have real strong friends or a very steep hill), let the clutch out in second or third gear.

What you are trying to do is to get the engine to turn over and start. I can almost gaurantee you that if you do it in first, you will be slammed forward and make you wish you had your seat belt on if you did not fasten it a priori. As well, if you are being pushed, your friends will curse you as the car comes almost to a dead stop while they are pushing. But really, if you are in second or third, you should be able to go several feet and you will actually feel the engine start to turn. Once it catches, it will normally lug on you (well, you are going slow, aren't you?). Push the clutch in so that the engine can idle and you can give it some gas to warm up. Then get moving to where ever it is you need to go to!

Learned this on a 1973 V6 Capri (the German model) one year in college when the batt went dead on me. Two tips. Always keep money to buy a new batt and never try to jump start a car in first gear.

Cheers!
 

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I thought a stock clutch with normal wear/tear would only last for ~50,000 miles? Hrm.


If that's true, that's awesome. And I do agree with you Z. If/when I get a lighter flywheel, I'd get a clutch upgrade. When I had my transmission replaced because of my crunchy 1st -> 2nd grinds when it's cold out, I asked about paying to have a TRD clutch put in. They said they couldn't do this b/c they were performing warrantied work. If i wanted the clutch put in I'd have to reschedule and come back. That kind of blows my mind, because I thought it would be easier for them to do this then b/c they had it all torn down. But whatever. *shrug*
 

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??? The OEM clutch in my Supra lasted 106k. The OEM clutch in my GTS Corolla lasted until my crazy girlfriend grabbed the wheel and drove us into a dividing wall on the freeway (88k) without issues.

I've never replaced a dead OEM clutch under 100k miles on a car I owned. Ever.

Keys to long clutch life:

1. Don't slip it mercilessly when racing. Launching at 4k and slipping the clutch is great for a quick start but burns up the clutch disk. This kills clutches faster than anything.

2. Don't ride with your foot on the clutch, put it on the dead pedal if you are not shifting (same is true for the gearshift, keep your hand off it unless you are shifting). Riding the clutch will make it slip excessively and burn out. See #1.

serith - your dealership sucks ass. They should have done that for you no questions asked if they were coolio techs. They are not for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by lo bux racer@Jan 27 2006, 11:53 PM
???  The OEM clutch in my Supra lasted 106k.  The OEM clutch in my GTS Corolla lasted until my crazy girlfriend grabbed the wheel and drove us into a dividing wall on the freeway (88k) without issues.

I've never replaced a dead OEM clutch under 100k miles on a car I owned.  Ever.

Keys to long clutch life:

1.  Don't slip it mercilessly when racing.  Launching at 4k and slipping the clutch is great for a quick start but burns up the clutch disk.  This kills clutches faster than anything.

2.  Don't ride with your foot on the clutch, put it on the dead pedal if you are not shifting (same is true for the gearshift, keep your hand off it unless you are shifting).  Riding the clutch will make it slip excessively and burn out.  See #1.

serith - your dealership sucks ass.  They should have done that for you no questions asked if they were coolio techs.  They are not for sure.
i keep my hand on my gearshift all the time

i dont put pressure on it, i just rest it on there
i dont see why you said to keep it off?
 

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It wears out the shifter forks. It also prevents you from gripping the wheel with two hands.
 

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Rollbot, listen to Lance(Lo Bux). He is one of the smartest car people on this whole forum and you should respect that. Not to be rude because I know your knew so you don't know him, but what he says is most likely the best thing you can do. Just a heads up.

-Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Originally posted by buderic@Jan 28 2006, 08:21 AM
Rollbot, listen to Lance(Lo Bux). He is one of the smartest car people on this whole forum and you should respect that. Not to be rude because I know your knew so you don't know him, but what he says is most likely the best thing you can do. Just a heads up.

-Eric
thank you

and thank you lo bux racer

... i dont know anyone here yet, and i was just asking a question on why its not good to hold it, not that i was being rude to him, just wondering why its better not to hold your hand on the gear shift.... but it seems lo bux racer knows a lot, so i will practice this.

thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Originally posted by serith@Jan 29 2006, 06:44 PM
If you always want to put your hand on the shifter, get an automatic. I'm not sure why people do it, but at least you wont hurt anything
well...

if the green light turns on...

i ussually keep my hand on it till about thrid
then i take it off and do fourth
and then i take my hand off

i dont keep it there the entire time
but i also dont take it off before third gear
 

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some people do it so that they are ready to shift gears at any given moment if the moment calls for it. fortunately i have long enough arms that i can put my elbow on the edge of the center arm rest and let my hand slightly rest on top of the shift knob.

i don't put any pressure on it in a way that it would pull back on the shifter so its really not hurting anything. it really only hurts it if you have the weight of your arm pulling back on it constantly. i always want my hand near my shifter so if i have to down shift to help the car slow down faster for any reason or something i can.

to me that split second of time that it takes to move your hand from the steering wheel to the shifter could cause alot. and yes i do know how to down shift really fast because people in my area suck at driving and i've had to do it alot to make a vehicle slow down faster. i know nobody has ever said i don't know how to downshift fast enough to help but i'm sure someone will...lol.
 

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Downshifting to brake is dumb. Keeping your hand on the shifter to change gears is also dumb. This is why the shifter needs to be close to the wheel anyway, but that's another story.

If you ride with your hand on the shifter, you will wear out your shifter forks faster than if you don't. You think you have no pressure, but the shifter forks know better.

It's your gearbox, but I wouldn't recommend your driving style to anyone interested in full gearbox service life.
 
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