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The silver might be a good option if you get yours scratched... But "installed" pics would really help you sell this stuff.
 

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That is actually cool. As long as its not vinyl overlays that never lay correctly, I may be interested in the carbon fiber overlays. I think it would look good.... Yeah, installed pics would look nice. So where is the group buy though? I think thats the same price they're listed for on the website?
 

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Originally posted by Eric@Sep 16 2004, 08:10 PM
I thought I saw the offer of $50 under the listed price, but the original post has been edited, so I guess whatever the offer was, it was rescinded
Hmm.... so whats the deal here? How much is it? And what was the original cost??
 

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Ironhead
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considering the simulated carbon fiber dash applique that scion offers with the xB runs 225, thats not a bad price at all.
i would really like to see how it looks installed. it would tie the carbon fiber hood into my car quite nicely. of course, i still need one of those, too. so many mods, so little time. oh, and money. dammit. i need a sponsor.
 

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Ironhead
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^^^ true that. patience is a virtue.
 

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you know what....now that I really thought about this, I don't think it's worth the money to install one of these....there are tons of much more useful upgrades out there, and I'd only install one of these kits if I was made of mulah.

It looks...nice....like it would complement the dash very well, but other than that, I don't see any reason to spend 200-250 on something like this. I'm all about functionality over flare, but of course that's just me, and my opinion alone.
 

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Originally posted by whosthatrussian@Oct 1 2004, 03:39 PM
I don't see any reason to spend 200-250 on something like this. I'm all about functionality over flare, but of course that's just me, and my opinion alone.
These are words of a person who spent $70 on a shift knob


The only sane reason that I see for these overlays is if you scratch your dash really bad and don't have any money to replace the plastic parts. So you buy a cheap overlay kit. That only works if the kit is cheap, of course...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
you know, eveyone says wait till prices drop, would you rather order something cheap from a company you dont know or order quality from a company you see trying to do something for the tC??

sorta like the questions i get all day long about the carbon fiber hoods and price differences.. would you rather buy this hood for a low price...



or one like this for a higher price??



made using infusion and not hand laid resin..




i am waiting on better pictures of everything from the project vehicle and they will be posted so you can see the quality. tCtunerz doesnt and is not going to use anything low quality on our car.
 

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Ironhead
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after checking up on the bbist hood, i am inclined to believe the double layer carbon fiber construction of theirs is plenty strong, and lighter than one with the skeleton.
how does the maintaining of the factory skeleton work, anyway? are your hoods carbon fiber layed over a factory hood framework? cause if so, where do you get your donor hoods?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
visit;
http://www.qworkzmc.com/sciontchood_3.htm

that shows how we produce our hoods. we use a process called infusio to make our hoods.

"Vacuum infusion permits much higher fiber content than conventional lay-up techniques which lowers part weight and boosts stiffness, important metrics for the Buckeye Bullet shell," explains Ashland engineer Dwight Russ. "The use of a vacuum reduces air bubbles and encourages resin penetration through fibers. Hand lay-up typically produces parts with no more than 25 to 45% fiber content depending on fiber type. Vacuum infusion can boost fiber fractions to 70%."


Definition: The use of vacuum to saturate or infuse a dry lay-up of glass fibers with resin, for improved properties.
Resin infusion is a specialized advanced laminating technique that greatly improves the quality and strength of fiberglass parts versus conventional hand lay up. Applying laminate engineering and resin infusion technology simultaneously allows for optimization of a part in terms of strength and weight. The use of resin infusion will likely become the standard in automotive carbon fiber construction and has been in use since the 1960s.

Essentially, this is how it works… Inside of the mold, after the usual mold release wax is applied, the "gel coat", and "skin coat" of thin fiberglass reinforcement are applied in the conventional manner and allowed to cure. From here on everything differs. Next in the infusion process the parts outer skin of fiber reinforcement fabrics are carefully fitted into the mold over top of the skin coat. These are put in dry and held in place with a spray contact adhesive. Because the technicians are not hurried and concerned with the narrow resin curing period as would be in conventional lay up, attention can be paid to quality and the conscientious cutting, fitting and orientation of the fabrics fibers and core. Next, in the case of a cored part, the structural core materials are cut and fitted, and adhered into place. Then the inner skin of reinforcement fabrics is carefully fitted over the core to form a sandwich. Subsequently in the case of a boat's hull the longitudinal stringers are cut, fitted, and put into place, with their fiberglass fabrics fitted over top. The installation of these materials may take several days. Next the resin distribution hoses and vacuum lines are laid out atop the fiberglass and the entire inside of the mold is covered with a large sheet of loosely fitting plastic sheeting and sealed onto the mold’s perimeter. With a vacuum pump all the air in this "vacuum bag" is evacuated which compresses or de-bulks the dry stack of reinforcement fabrics. Through the series of feed hoses sealed into the bag, catalyzed resin is then sucked via the vacuum from large mixing containers. Over a couple hours the resin migrates throughout the mold saturating the entire stack of laminate. The vacuum is kept on until the resin has cured several hours later. The vacuum bag and feed hoses are removed, and the part's lamination is complete.

The bottom line is the quality of an infused part is stronger, lighter and superior to a piece done using conventional hand lay-up because…

Traditional methods of bonding the core to the skin call for a polyester paste that is manually spread onto the cured surface of the fiberglass with the core being bedded into it. Clamping pressure is applied until the bonding material is cured. The integrity with this method relies upon the technician’s skill level, the performance of the bonding paste and its ability to adhere to the cured skin. This process can leave air voids within the bond layer and in the many “contour slits” in the core. This in conjunction with the inherent relative weakness of the bonding material all constitute strength losses.
 

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Ironhead
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i am familiar with the process of infusion. i wanted to know about the factory framework / cross supports that are evident from your pictures. thats why i asked this in my last post.


"how does the maintaining of the factory skeleton work, anyway? are your hoods carbon fiber layed over a factory hood framework? cause if so, where do you get your donor hoods?"

edited to add: and, since your hood is lighter, i imagine you have weighed one. so, whats the weight of one of your hoods?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Originally posted by inevitablegod@Oct 7 2004, 03:22 PM
i am familiar with the process of infusion.  i wanted to know about the factory framework / cross supports that are evident from your pictures.  thats why i asked this in my last post.


"how does the maintaining of the factory skeleton work, anyway? are your hoods carbon fiber layed over a factory hood framework? cause if so, where do you get your donor hoods?"

edited to add:  and, since your hood is lighter, i imagine you have weighed one.  so, whats the weight of one of your hoods?
no, our mold was made using a stock tC hood...


First step is to apply flanges.


Flanges applied awaiting wax and gel coat.


Wax and gel coat applied.


Fiberglass applied to top of hood.


Bottom of hood, flanges are removed.


Bottom of hood, flanges removed with wax and gel coat applied.


Bottom of hood, more layers of fiberglass added to.


Mold complete with support braces installed!


Mold Complete!

Thats how we get the stock skeleton.
 

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Discussion Starter #19

Top of hood after infusion process.


Skeleton of hood after fiberglass, latch and metal bars for hood screws.
Notice around the edge of the hood fiberglass strands are placed to bond top of hood with skeleton.

i havent weighd the hoods yet, waiting to get the time to video a suburban rollign our hoods over and a few guys jumping on the hood while installed on a car to show durability. if you dont have a skeleton, whats there to give more support to the cf??
 

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Ironhead
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so, whats with all the fiberglass if its a carbon fiber hood?
 
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