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Discussion Starter #1
hey guys, i've read a number of posts that say take it easy the first 1k miles and don't run your engine above 4k rpm, others say run it hard first 20 miles to seal the pistons, some one else posted a link that describes how to break in an engine, hard. here's the link: http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

I'm confused because there are a lot of contradicting statements out there, and i don't wanna screw up my car, in the very beginning especially. Let me know if you have any insight.
 

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I've read the mototuneusa website and I've read other people's opinions that you should follow the factory directions and break your car in easy. I have no idea which really is better for the engine.

BUT, I'm gonna be breaking mine in the mototuneusa way for one reason: If the car/engine is going to have problems I definately want to expose them sooner rather than later and preferably while the engine is still under warranty.
 

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The "1,000 miles" thing is nothing new. My Dad told me when I was about 7 that you're supposed to take it easy on a new car, not accelerate hard, etc., for the first 1,000 miles. No one seems to do that anymore, but that's what I've always been told, and that's what seems to me to make the most sense, so that's what I'll be doing unless the manual says otherwise...
 

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Originally posted by crix@Jul 26 2004, 06:21 AM
BUT, I'm gonna be breaking mine in the mototuneusa way for one reason: If the car/engine is going to have problems I definately want to expose them sooner rather than later and preferably while the engine is still under warranty.
The only problem with going that route is that you may create problems with the engine that (1) might not have occurred otherwise, and (2) might not manifest themselves until after your warranty is up. The truth is, I think that so many people these days are buying cars that they can't afford (and know they will be repossessed) or leasing cars, so they just don't care whether they screw the things up. That, and lots of people are stupid as hell when it comes to how to take care of a car.

If you plan to keep your car for awhile, though, beware -- what you do now may have repercussions for your car much farther down the road.
 

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Well, I read all five parts of the "secrets of breaking in a motor" from mototune, and what he says does have logic/makes sense, but don't misinterpret it and make sure you get all the information...

this method he describes is used for racing motorcycles. while it also applies to any other two/four stroke engine as he says (because they operate on the same basis), also keep in mind that those motorcycles are for racing.

from what i understand, in full-race applications, you are not really worried about how long the motor is going to last, because they do not need to last for hundreds of thousands of miles. for a daily driver, it's a little bit different.

anyway, i am concluding that i will not "break it in easy," and i will not drive it into the ground either. i'm going to try to find the happy medium and gradually break it in; this means not babying it 24/7, but it also means not redlining it either. i would recommend the same to anyone else.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
sounds good, thanks for the input guys.
 

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From the site, JZA70, posted.

QUOTE
0-200 miles: Keep under 3,000 RPM. No lugging the engine (let it rev free). Give it about 10 first-gear shots to 4,000 RPM.

200-400 miles: Raise rev ceiling to 4,000 RPM with 10 first and second-gear shots to 4,500 RPM.

400-600 miles: Rev ceiling to 4,500 RPM with 10 shots to 5,000 RPM through third gear.

600-800 miles: Rev ceiling to 5,500 RPM with 10 shots to 6,000 RPM.

800-1000 miles: Rev ceiling to 6,000 RPM with 10 shots to 6,500 RPM[/b]
Seems pretty easy.
 

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yeah had a brand new 1996 civic.. just drove normal when breaking it in.. but not keeping it too long at any one speed, varying the speeds all the time.. a real pain for 1000 miles but worth it.. made it to 132,000 without a problem.. i kinda think that new engines today don't require such delicate procedures, they're already manufactured to tight tolerances because of emissions etc.. but that's just my $0.02..
 

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Damnit, why isn't there any definitive information on this subject? All these articles read somewhat like OpEds.

Grrr...
 

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Because all cars are made differently. Not all motors are 2.4L four cylinder and naturally aspirated, like the tC. Use your best judgement. First, always make sure you warm up the car. Notice in the manual it says that warming up should be done while driving and not idling.

While driving, I would keep the revs under 4k RPMs and give the car plenty of acceleration in all gears and also deceleration while in gear too, but that's just me

danny
 

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Originally posted by SilverX@Jul 26 2004, 05:50 PM
From the site, JZA70, posted.

QUOTE
0-200 miles: Keep under 3,000 RPM. No lugging the engine (let it rev free). Give it about 10 first-gear shots to 4,000 RPM.

200-400 miles: Raise rev ceiling to 4,000 RPM with 10 first and second-gear shots to 4,500 RPM.

400-600 miles: Rev ceiling to 4,500 RPM with 10 shots to 5,000 RPM through third gear.

600-800 miles: Rev ceiling to 5,500 RPM with 10 shots to 6,000 RPM.

800-1000 miles: Rev ceiling to 6,000 RPM with 10 shots to 6,500 RPM
Seems pretty easy. [/b][/quote]
my boyfriend said this type of break in is only for rebuilt motors.....he STRONGLY doesnt recomend this!


liz
 

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when you rebuild an engine, you're pretty much restoring it to specs when it came out of the factory, so pretty much it's the same thing. part of the breaking in of the engine (rebuilt or new) is to get the piston rings to seat properly so that you can achieve a good SEAL in the cylinders, yielding good compression.

as quoted from overboost...:
Brand New Engines

When you buy a new car, "dry" starting of the engine and oil system priming has been taken care of for you. If you're in a situation where you've rebuilt an engine and it is completely green, you can follow the above break-in procedure but only after prefacing it with a few other items. First of all, you'll want the oil system primed before firing the engine. When we build engines here this is how we do it. The pistons, rings and cylinder walls are sprayed liberally with WD-40 with the piston pins lubed with 20W-50 engine oil. Assembly lube everywhere else, but absolutely no assembly lube in the cylinder bores. Assemble and install the engine without sparkplugs, crank engine on the starter until oil pressure builds, then install plugs and fire. Camshafts will require their own break-in procedure; this is simply done by immediately revving the engine to 2,500 RPM and holding it there for 20 minutes. Once that's done, start driving.



it seems the article makes a conscious reference to brand new engines, without disapproving of the break-in procedure. i plan to drive the vehicle between 2k and 4k rpms in all gears with plenty of acceleration and deceleration while in gear. whether or not you choose to use this break in procedure is up to you.
 

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chances are, only a couple of you on here in this thread have EVER built a motor haha. So with that being said, follow the directions in the manual, since toyota of course has built millions of motors with great succes when referring to longevity.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
hahahah, good point, tcrazy.
 

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When I took drivers education, I saw a video on general car stuff. It said instead of warming up your car idly, just go. Why? Because of the "excessive gas in the cylinders."

Well I've always seen people idlying their car's, so I'm not sure what's true.

To warm it up, or to just hit the gas and go; anyone know?
 

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Ive heard that a few seconds of idlying can help warm the engine to where it lubes up the inside, and by hitting the gas as soon as u start it can cause wear, but thats just my.02
 

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excessive idling is bad for the engine because it heats up to points where the cooling system must strain to keep up etc....YES even in the winter. What I do is turn the key so that the power comes on, fuel pump, oil pump etc.....let the oil and fuel lines prime themselves and then after 3 seconds I start the car. Let it come down from 1200 rpm idle to around 900 and procede slowly for about 4 minutes.....then just drive normally:)
 
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